HealthReach and HABL(A)

Case Analysis

In 2004 there were 50 million non-native English speakers in the United States and an additional 22 million that had marginal English skills. Many had no health insurance or access to low-cost, affordable health care. This case describes the dilemma in 2004 by Jim Zimmerman, executive director of the Illinois-based Health Reach Clinic, which serves the area facing the uninsured poor, when deciding which initiatives to continue the funding. One of them was Health Care Access by Language Advocacy (HABLA), … Read more »

In 2004 there were 50 million non-native English speakers in the United States and an additional 22 million that had marginal English skills. Many had no health insurance or access to low-cost, affordable health care. This case describes the dilemma in 2004 by Jim Zimmerman, executive director of the Illinois-based Health Reach Clinic, which serves the area facing the uninsured poor, when deciding which initiatives to continue the funding. One of them was Health Care Access by Language Advocacy (HABLA) developed a medical interpretation program in 2001 to bridge the language barrier between the volunteers and their medical personnel Hispanic patients, many of whom spoke little or no English. This was a program proved invaluable, but Zimmerman funds were tight.
This is a Darden case study.
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from
Pat Werhane,
Justin Sheehan,
Jenny Mead
Source: Darden School of Business
4 pages.
Release Date: 29 February 2008. Prod #: UV1152-PDF-ENG
Health Reach and HABLA (A) HBR case solution