Alex Montana sat at his desk pondering the career decision before him. Alex was Director of the North American division of EB Manufacturing, a $ 4.6 billion Cleveland-based company with offices on three continents. ESH-chief Montana had just offered a promotion to global vice-president. Montana would normally jumped at such an opportunity, but he was concerned about the impact on his strained personal life. Since his last promotion, he had trouble balancing an increasingly demanding … Read more »

Alex Montana sat at his desk pondering the career decision before him. Alex was Director of the North American division of EB Manufacturing, a $ 4.6 billion Cleveland-based company with offices on three continents. ESH-chief Montana had just offered a promotion to global vice-president. Montana would normally jumped at such an opportunity, but he was concerned about the impact on his strained personal life. Since his last promotion, he had trouble balancing an increasingly demanding workload with his responsibility to his wife and daughter at home. Montana felt pressure to accept the promotion. His boss expected him to accept, in fact, his boss had stressed that he had no other choice. He had always dreamed of making it big in the business world. Success in this new role could put him in contention for COO and eventually CEO. But at what price?
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from
Thomas J. DeLong
Michael Kernish
Source: Harvard Business School
9 sides.
Publication Date: Jun 30,, 2005. Prod #: 405106-PDF-ENG
Alex Montana at ESH Manufacturing Co. HBR case solution

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