In April 2008, following the successful transition Octone Records Universal Music Group and the relaunch of the label as A & M / Octone Records, is President and Chief Executive Officer James servant facing a new challenge. Servant and his leadership team have to convince effort a promising new act, Paper Tongues, at A & M / Octone, on a so-called All rights deal, which means that the label would be a percentage of the artist indicated receive revenue sources, including join music recordings Concert ticket sales … Read more »

In April 2008, following the successful transition Octone Records Universal Music Group and the relaunch of the label as A & M / Octone Records, is President and Chief Executive Officer James servant facing a new challenge. Servant and his leadership team have to convince effort a promising new act, Paper Tongues, at A & M / Octone join on a so-called All rights deal, which means that the label would be indicated to receive revenue sources, a percentage of all of the artist, including recorded music , concert ticket sales, merchandising, commercial licensing, sponsorship and endorsements. The negotiations are stalled. If A & M / Octone on his “all-rights or No Deal” to hold position? Or was it just to change the time to a recorded-music deal? Designed for use alongside “Octone Records” HBS No. 507-082, the case allows for a detailed examination of the development of new products and talent management strategies in the context of the music industry. The case provides rich insights into the contracts between labels and artists are structured, and how advances in technology have an impact on the music industry and its players.
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from
Anita Elberse,
Elie Ofek,
Caren Kelleher
Source: Harvard Business School
12 pages.
Release date: 30 July 2010. Prod #: 511031-PDF-ENG
A & M / Octone Records: All or Nothing rights? HBR case solution

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