Examines the development of the atomic film – one of the few companies that the wave of failures in digital entertainment survived in 2000 – from the time of its founding in 1998 until its merger with Shockwave in December 2000. Within a short time AtomFilms had identified a significant library of short films, a brand name with short form content and built revenue streams from multiple online sales channels. Focuses on several important decisions, Mika Salmi, the CEO, including determ … Read more »

Examines the development of the atomic film – one of the few companies that the wave of failures in digital entertainment survived in 2000 – from the time of its founding in 1998 until its merger with Shockwave in December 2000. Within a short time AtomFilms had identified a significant library of short films, a brand name with short form content and built revenue streams from multiple online sales channels. Focuses on several important decisions, Mika Salmi, the CEO, including the determination of the future of the company branding strategy, the decision on the allocation of resources between the online and offline parts of the business, structuring a deal with a distinguished peer to-peer network for audiovisual content and managing relationships with multiple wireless companies to distribute short-form content. Finally Salmi has to decide on the company’s post-merger and the impact of such a strategy on the organization of the company strategy.
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from
Bharat N. Anand,
Taz Pirmohamed
Source: Harvard Business School
36 pages.
Publication Date: Jun 19, 2001. Prod #: 701063-PDF-ENG
AtomFilms HBR case solution