After the scandals at Enron, WorldCom, and Qwest Communications, the profession of accountants has tried in recent years to get back on track. While Sarbanes-Oxley can improve the decision making process of audit procedures professionals, and to avoid future large-scale disasters, hurt the shareholders and bring business, there is another problem in public accounting that few consider, and no one has proposed to solve: different behavior on workplace. Previous research describes deviant wor … Read more »

After the scandals at Enron, WorldCom, and Qwest Communications, the profession of accountants has tried in recent years to get back on track. While Sarbanes-Oxley can improve the decision making process of audit procedures professionals, and to avoid future large-scale disasters, hurt the shareholders and bring business, there is another problem in public accounting that few consider, and no one has proposed to solve: different behavior on workplace. Previous research describes deviant behavior in the workplace as a voluntary behavior organizational members that violates significant organizational norms and thereby threatens the well-being of the organization and / or its members. Building from recent work in various fields of business literature, this is the first research to examine workplace deviance at Big 4 accounting firms since the passage of Sarbanes-Oxley. Taking a multidisciplinary, collaborative approach, the authors try to explain why workplace deviance has infiltrated accounting firms and how they undermine their effectiveness and derailment long-term prospects for success. After describing their origin and effect, the authors write in various management strategies to avoid and minimize the variance of their impact on a business.
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Ronald Jelinek
Kate Jelinek
Source: Business Horizons
11 pages.
Release Date: 15, May 2008. Prod #: BH278-PDF-ENG
Auditors Gone Wild: The “other” problem in Public Accounting HBR case solution

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