By 2006, despite the lack of a significant reform of the Russian banking system had recovered from the crisis of 1998 and significantly exceeded its indicators such as capital, assets and loans the levels before 1998. The Russian economy had rapidly expanded primarily as a result of higher energy prices. However, many analysts were concerned about the large role played by oil and gas, and fears that energy exports were of the value of the ruble is so high that non-energy production has been hurt … Read more »

By 2006, despite the lack of a significant reform of the Russian banking system had recovered from the crisis of 1998 and significantly exceeded its indicators such as capital, assets and loans the levels before 1998. The Russian economy had rapidly expanded primarily as a result of higher energy prices. However, many analysts were concerned about the large role played by oil and gas, and fears that energy exports were of the value of the ruble is so high that non-energy production is the ground. V. Bank had survived the crisis of 1998, and was regarded as one of the top 25 banks. Despite this progress, emphasized its financial reports, a number of concerns. Moreover, Russia’s political situation seemed precarious, as shown in the Khodorkovsky crisis, as a result, the majority of which returned Gazprom and Yukos assets in state ownership. Some analysts to a resurgence of authoritarian and arbitrary government intervention, and discussed it the possibility of a liberal political reaction in Russia similar to the “Orange Revolution” in Ukraine.
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from
David W. Conklin,
Danielle Cadieux
Source: Ivey Publishing
5 pages.
Release date: 06 February, 2006. Prod #: 906M14-PDF-ENG
Bank Vozrozhdeniye (V.Bank) (B) HBR case solution

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