Every day, around the world, babies and children are sold. Often, these transactions appear on or be beyond the market. Orphaned children are never “sold” – they are “matched” with their “forever families.” The eggs are “donated”, and surrogate mothers offer their services to help infertile. Certainly the rhetoric that surrounds these transactions has little to do with markets or profits. Quite possible that people who want to commit themselves to help. But neither the Rhe … Read more »

Every day, around the world, babies and children are sold. Often, these transactions appear on or be beyond the market. Orphaned children are never “sold” – they are “matched” with their “forever families.” The eggs are “donated”, and surrogate mothers offer their services to help infertile. Certainly the rhetoric that surrounds these transactions has little to do with markets or profits. Quite possible that people who want to commit themselves to help. But neither the rhetoric nor the motive, the underlying activity. If parents ova or sperm contract with surrogates, buy or choose to take a child or an embryo to implant, they are doing business. Examines the workings of the baby trafficking, exploring a technology area where currently runs far faster than rules.
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from
Cate Reavis,
Debora L. Spar
Source: Harvard Business School
17 pages.
Release Date: 26 March 2004. Prod #: 704 037 PDF-ENG
Business of life HBR case solution