The relationship between indigenous peoples and the Canadian government has been marked by conflict and change. Although the Conservative government seemed to support Aboriginal goals if it be suffered and signed the Declaration by United Nations in 2007, a historic apology for the abuses of the residential schools program issued on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2008, it included brought changes to the Indian Act of 2012 Omnibus Bill C-45, the economic development of leadership, the enviro … Read more »

The relationship between indigenous peoples and the Canadian government has been marked by conflict and change. Although the Conservative government seemed to support Aboriginal goals if it be suffered and signed the Declaration by United Nations in 2007, a historic apology for the abuses of the residential schools program issued on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2008, it included brought changes to the Indian Act of 2012 Omnibus Bill C-45, the economic development leadership, environmental protection and injuring dozens of First Nations treaties. In response, a group of activists launched the First Nations Idle No More movement, social media to organize demonstrations across the country, including teach-ins, flash mob dance and blockades of major transportation routes used. Although supported by many non-Aboriginal environmental and human rights groups in Canada and abroad, the movement to lose steam appears after the Prime Minister met with Aboriginal leaders to eight key elements of consensus on measures to sketch Aboriginal and treaty to address health rights, education and employment issues, and suspended Chief Theresa Spence on hunger strike had galvanized support. How could the organizers Idle No More dynamic and awareness they had worked so hard to achieve?
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from
Gerard Seijts,
Jana Seijts,
Paul Bigus
Source: Ivey Publishing
18 pages.
Release Date: 9 July 2013. Prod #: W13281-PDF-ENG
Aboriginal Canada: Idle No More HBR case solution

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