In the 1990s, CEMEX went from a purely domestic manufacturer of cement and ready-mix concrete in Mexico’s third-largest company in the rapidly globalizing cement industry, with offices in North and South America, Western Europe and Southeast Asia, as well as a large trading company operation. CEMEX first steps to internationalize through exporting to the United States, fell into conflict with an anti-dumping regulation. Then began a series of acquisitions, first in Spain and then in Central and South American … Read more »

In the 1990s, CEMEX went from a purely domestic manufacturer of cement and ready-mix concrete in Mexico’s third-largest company in the rapidly globalizing cement industry, with offices in North and South America, Western Europe and Southeast Asia, as well as a large trading company operation. CEMEX first steps to internationalize through exporting to the United States, fell into conflict with an anti-dumping regulation. Then began a series of acquisitions, first in Spain and then in Central and South America. This case describes the process of acquisitions and post-merger acquisition. This raises the question of whether the economic crisis in Southeast Asia opens up opportunities for further expansion. Can be used to investigate to enter the logic and the process of internationalization in a commodity business, and selecting the markets. Can also be used to investigate what many think to be a very local business, the basis for globalization. Finally, it provides an opportunity to the logic of global competition moves investigate how CEMEX started in Spain, which should explicitly to counter a European rival aggressive expansion in Mexico.
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from
Joel Podolny,
John Roberts,
Joon Han,
Andrea Hodge
Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business
35 pages.
Release Date: 09 July, 1999. Prod #: IB17-PDF-ENG
CEMEX, SA de CV: Global Competition in a Local Business HBR case solution

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