On 21 Died in October 2001, a postal worker from a mail-sorting facility in Washington, DC, of ​​inhalation anthrax disease is virtually invisible for a century. The next day a second employee died from the same plant. Fear of anthrax had already infected the public: media workers in Florida and New York City had contracted the disease. In addition, Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-SD) had received an anthrax-laden letter to all of his employees were on antibiotics and the Senate and represented … Read more »

On 21 Died in October 2001, a postal worker from a mail-sorting facility in Washington, DC, of ​​inhalation anthrax disease is virtually invisible for a century. The next day a second employee died from the same plant. Fear of anthrax had already infected the public: media workers in Florida and New York City had contracted the disease. In addition, Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-SD) had received an anthrax-laden letter that his staff were all on antibiotics, and the House and Senate buildings were closed for anthrax testing. This new threat to a sense of public panic ignited again. Practically overnight, the United States Postal Service (USPS) found itself in the eye of national security and public health storm. This case describes how the USPS is concerned with the anthrax crisis. HKS case number 1692.0.
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from
Arnold Howitt,
Kirsten Lundberg
50 pages.
Release date: 01 May 2003. Prod #: HKS872-PDF-ENG
A course in a storm: U.S. Postal Service and the Anthrax Crisis HBR case solution