In 2001, Citibank Cash and Trade Group division transformed itself into an e-business, with the strategic intent of the transformation of traditional money management business into an e-business framework. This case describes how Citibank, with its traditional investments and the integration of Internet initiatives in its e-business strategy to create sustainable competitive advantages. The competition in the cash and trade business is becoming more intense and vyin a new generation of competent and aggressive competitors … Read more »

In 2001, Citibank Cash and Trade Group division transformed itself into an e-business, with the strategic intent of the transformation of traditional money management business into an e-business framework. This case describes how Citibank, with its traditional investments and the integration of Internet initiatives in its e-business strategy to create sustainable competitive advantages. The competition in the cash and trade business is becoming more intense and compete a new generation of competent and aggressive competitors to the market, including technology companies in B2B e-payment interest. Citibank responded to the competition by constantly evolving its e-business strategy – to connect, to transform, to renew. Also looks into the challenges, Citibank e-Business Group is geared towards the development of a single global web platform for the corporate market. The focus is on how Citibank is the development of an e-business product that is highly segmented the market and how to promote these markets to use a global online platform that would serve. At one end of the spectrum are multinational companies and top-level domestic companies engaged in demanding cash, and at the other end are companies and small and medium-sized companies that are not ready to upgrade and transform their systems.
«Hide

from
Julie Yu,
Ali F. Farhoomand,
Marissa McCauley,
Shamza Khan
Source: University of Hong Kong
13 pages.
Release Date: 7 June 2002. Prod #: HKU197-PDF-ENG
Citibank e-Business Strategy for Global Corporate Banking HBR case solution