Clifford Chance LLP, a global law firm headquartered in London, has to make a decision about whether to remain in the central business district of London or to a reorganized business park in Canary Wharf, to make three miles outside of London. Peter Charleton, head of the London office, proposes to move to Canary Wharf and the establishment of a single, landmark headquarters with all the necessary amenities and premium fit-outs, which is for an elite firm. The tension surrounding the event t … Read more »

Clifford Chance LLP, a global law firm headquartered in London, has to make a decision about whether to remain in the central business district of London or to a reorganized business park in Canary Wharf, to make three miles outside of London. Peter Charleton, head of the London office, proposes to move to Canary Wharf and the establishment of a single, landmark headquarters with all the necessary amenities and premium fit-outs, which is for an elite firm. The tension surrounding the case, the choice of the hub of trade in the center of London to a relatively obscure website, its owner (Olympia & York) have to move a story of financial bankruptcy. What business elements (customers, operations, employees, etc.) should consider them if they to place the company and how much to move relative weight for each element? As you can see frame the pros and cons between London and Canary Wharf? What kind of items they should program in the new system (cellular or open floor plans, ceiling heights, common area, dining facilities, gyms, etc.)? How should they prioritize these items?
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from
Arthur I sail,
A. Eugene Kohn,
Nhat Nguyen
Source: Harvard Business School
5 pages.
Publication Date: Oct 18, 2006. Prod #: 207073-PDF-ENG
Clifford Chance: repot the tree HBR case solution

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