The case deals with Gilead Sciences, a biopharmaceutical company with several FDA approved HIV / AIDS drugs. In 2006, the company Gilead Access Program to improve access to HIV / AIDS drugs in developing countries started. In India, which also happens to be the largest producer of generic drugs, Gilead signed a voluntary license agreement for its drug, Viread, with 13 companies. By 2011, Mylan had (previously known as Matrix Laboratories), one of the 13 Indian companies emerged as the lead … Read more »

The case deals with Gilead Sciences, a biopharmaceutical company with several FDA approved HIV / AIDS drugs. In 2006, the company Gilead Access Program to improve access to HIV / AIDS drugs in developing countries started. In India, which also happens to be the largest producer of generic drugs, Gilead signed a voluntary license agreement for its drug, Viread, with 13 companies. By 2011, Mylan had (previously known as Matrix Laboratories) emerged one of the 13 Indian companies as the leading supplier for Viread, with two-thirds of the global market. To accelerate their market reach, Gilead wanted to expand the scope of the agreement with four major Indian companies, including Mylan. Gregg Alton, Executive Vice President, Corporate and Medical Affairs, had to decide how to convince his partner from coming on board and how to perform the Contract.
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Nita Sachan,
Anand Tatambothla,
Revati Nehru,
Charles Dhanaraj
Source: Indian School of Business
20 pages.
Release date: 30 June 2013. Prod #: ISB025-PDF-ENG
Joint marketing, Gilead Sciences: Solving the Innovation Vs. Access tradeoff HBR case solution

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