This case examines the various considerations. For the selection and compensation of employees in a context where their work involves a pro-social component This is relevant not only medical care in Zambia, but NGOs and public employees, both of which are motivated by the mission of their positions and compensation. Zambia was facing a shortage of medical professionals with less than half of the health workforce needed to meet health. Nevertheless, it was simultaneously loaded by high INCI … Read more »

This case examines the various considerations. For the selection and compensation of employees in a context where their work involves a pro-social component This is relevant not only medical care in Zambia, but NGOs and public employees, both of which are motivated by the mission of their positions and compensation. Zambia was facing a shortage of medical professionals with less than half of the health workforce needed to meet health. Nevertheless, it was burdened by the same high incidence of diseases such as HIV / AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, malnutrition and respiratory infections and diarrheal diseases. The Zambian Ministry of Health (MoH) recognized that in the short term, it would be impossible, the number of doctors and nurses needed to work to fill this gap. They were employed, taking into account the inclusion of mainly volunteer community health worker (CHW) in place of the MoH health staff. Given the high level of personal commitment and dedication with the right training and skills necessary to be an effective community health workers are combined, the MoH was struggling to recruit and retain the best strategy to identify motivated and able CHWs.
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Nava Ashraf
Natalie Kindred
Source: Harvard Business School
31 pages.
Release Date: 02 March 2010. Prod #: 910030-PDF-ENG
Community Health Workers in Zambia: Incentive Design and Management HBR case solution

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