In December 2007, streamed more than 75 percent of all U.S. Internet users have some form of video online, consume more than 10 billion videos in total. While devices such as AppleTV and TiVo allows users to watch internet video on your TV, Internet video was supplied largely a web-based phenomenon. Nevertheless, the industry for the inevitable collision between Internet video and TV preparation was. While a video signal may be fed via coaxial cable with copper wires or f … Read more »

In December 2007, streamed more than 75 percent of all U.S. Internet users have some form of video online, consume more than 10 billion videos in total. While devices such as AppleTV and TiVo allows users to watch internet video on your TV, Internet video was supplied largely a web-based phenomenon. Nevertheless, the industry for the inevitable collision between Internet video and TV preparation was. While a video signal could be fed via coaxial cable with copper wires or fiber-optic connections, the majority of U.S. consumers would continue to receive their TV signal and Internet service through a cable connection for the foreseeable future. This case examines the transition to IP video delivery in 2008 from the perspective of the company, also known the “tube”, particularly telecommunications companies, descendants of the 1982 AT & T sales and cable companies, otherwise known as Multiple System Operator (MSO) own.

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from
Robert A. Burgelman,
Rob Holmes
Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business
25 pages.
Release date: 30 May 2008. Prod #: SM173-PDF-ENG
Convergence 2008: video over the Internet HBR case solution

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