Chrysler and Daimler-Benz shareholders approved the largest corporate merger in history. After months of negotiations, the chairman of the German-based Daimler-Benz management board and the chairman and CEO of the U.S. Chrysler Corp. for were when the two companies would officially join forces to create the fifth largest automaker in the preparation of the world. These two managers were officially charged with the responsibility of bringing together two companies that were very different from e … Read more »

Chrysler and Daimler-Benz shareholders approved the largest corporate merger in history. After months of negotiations, the chairman of the German-based Daimler-Benz management board and the chairman and CEO of the U.S. Chrysler Corp. for were when the two companies would officially join forces to create the fifth largest automaker in the preparation of the world. These two managers were officially charged with the responsibility of bringing together two companies that were significantly different from each other. Chrysler was known for its efficient production and efficient vehicles. Daimler-Benz sold luxury vehicles, and his reputation was on craftsmanship, quality and safety. Chrysler executives were in the habit of limiting operating expenses; Daimler-Benz executives not. Between the two companies there were huge differences in cultures, market segments, product lines, salaries and attitudes. Aware of the excitement of its investors and the care of their critics, the two leaders are expected to forge and promote the vision at the Daimler-Chrysler will base its future.
«Hide

from
Brian Golden
Nicole Nolan
Source: Ivey Publishing
3 pages.
Release Date: 04 March 2003. Prod #: 902C06-PDF-ENG
Crafting a Vision At Daimler-Chrysler HBR case solution

[related_post themes="flat"]