In the past 18 months, Mandy Cabot had worried that the shoe business, which they had built a thriving business with $ 90 million in annual sales and more than 110 employees might instead a “House of Cards”. The management philosophy that led Dansko growth “home schooling” – among young energetic staff with little work experience and mentoring them – seemed ill-suited for the next phase of growth. Just as precarious was the fact that with few exceptions none of the senior mana … Read more »

In the past 18 months, Mandy Cabot had worried that the shoe business, which they had built a thriving business with $ 90 million in annual sales and more than 110 employees might instead a “House of Cards”. The management philosophy that led Dansko growth “home schooling” – among young energetic staff with little work experience and mentoring them – seemed ill-suited for the next phase of growth. Just as precarious was the fact that with few exceptions none of the senior management team had no previous experience in the footwear industry. So if a well-respected industry leader, to talk about a merger, Cabot asked, had to admit that her “crisis of confidence”, it could just be time.
«Hide

from
Amy C. Edmondson,
Victoria W. Winston
Source: Harvard Business School
20 pages.
Publication Date: Apr 21,, 2006. Prod #: 606071-PDF-ENG
Dansko, Inc. HBR case solution