After 11 September 2001 attacks on the United States, President George W. Bush launched a military offensive in Afghanistan, as the mastermind of the attacks that led to the capture of Al Qaeda. Top U.S. officials discussed how to extract important information from them about future plans Al Qaeda. The Central Intelligence Agency wanted to aggressive interrogation methods that argues were necessary to persuade prisoners to reveal what they knew, apply. But CIA officials worried … Read more »

After 11 September 2001 attacks on the United States, President George W. Bush launched a military offensive in Afghanistan, as the mastermind of the attacks that led to the capture of Al Qaeda. Top U.S. officials discussed how to extract important information from them about future plans Al Qaeda. The Central Intelligence Agency wanted to aggressive interrogation methods that argues were necessary to persuade prisoners to reveal what they knew, apply. But CIA officials concerned such techniques could both international treaties banning torture and “cruel, inhuman or degrading” treatment of prisoners of war and detainees and more consistently, the national law which they violate enforced. To protect its agents, the CIA tried a clear statement of the Bush administration, as well, they might be in the efforts to force prisoners to go to talk. These cases tell the story of the OLC legal findings and their consequences. Part A (1853.0) describes a number of OLC memoranda regarding the treatment of detainees in the “war on terror”, culminating in a statement, known as the August 2002 “torture memo,” which narrowly construed the legal significance become of torture, but took a broad view of the war powers of the President under the Constitution. Part A ends as Assistant Attorney General and OLC head Jay Bybee must decide whether to sign the opinion. Part B (1854.0) following the results of the torture memo, tracing the use of interrogation methods sanctioned CIA detention centers overseas to the naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. In the view of some, these techniques harder eventually “migrated” to Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, where abuse of prisoners was an international embarrassment for the United States. HKS case number 1,854.1
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from
Esther Scott,
Philip Heymann
10 pages.
Release Date: 14 December 2006. Prod #: HKS208-PDF-ENG
Defining Torture in the War on Terror (Sequel) HBR case solution

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