Delamere Vineyard is a small, integrated wine company in Tasmania, specializing in Pinot Noir (red) and Chardonnay (white) wines. Richard Richardson, Delamere owner and winemaker, manages and operates the vineyard and winery largely alone. Its products have won praise and awards in the past, but Richardson is continually striving to improve. Delamere competes in the high price segment, in which quality is paramount. Richardson is known as a winery equipped – with a Ph.D. in agricultural … Read more »

Delamere Vineyard is a small, integrated wine company in Tasmania, specializing in Pinot Noir (red) and Chardonnay (white) wines. Richard Richardson, Delamere owner and winemaker, manages and operates the vineyard and winery largely alone. Its products have won praise and awards in the past, but Richardson is continually striving to improve. Delamere competes in the high price segment, in which quality is paramount. Richardson is known as a winery equipped – with a Ph.D. in agricultural chemistry and 15 years of experience – but he is both quality problems and opportunities for improvement. He is also under cost pressure. Customers and industry experts provide conflicting advice. At the time the case, Richardson is a choice between three possible quality improvement projects: Develop an effective means of oxidation during wine maturation prevent; implement the means to deepen the wine color and to find experimentation, the optimum blend of berries and stems during fermentation. The examination of these options shows that they mean a focus on divergent conceptions of quality, as well as different ways to improve. They also suggest various options for longer-term growth.
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Jonathan West
Source: Harvard Business School
21 pages.
Release Date: 02 February, 1998. Prod #: 698 051 PDF-ENG
Delamere Vineyard HBR case solution

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