Companies would look very different if managers thought like designers, the authors argue. For one, it would always start with empathy – a deep understanding of their customers. Second, they would themselves be seen as a creator of new-to-the-world products and services. Learn as they go “and the inclusion of the new learning in the next iteration. – And thirdly, they would get into the habit, go through the path to a solution during his many managers underestimate the power of design, a formal process … Read more »

Companies would look very different if managers thought like designers, the authors argue. For one, it would always start with empathy – a deep understanding of their customers. Second, they would themselves be seen as a creator of new-to-the-world products and services. Learn as they go “and the inclusion of the new learning in the next iteration. – And thirdly, they would get into the habit, go through the path to a solution be While appreciate the power of design many managers, a formal process is difficult to determine been, until now, the authors describe a four-step process for bringing Design Thinking of life, the question of, What if begins and ends wondering what works with -.?. Introducing and learn stage at the end, they show that an inevitable, but healthy tension will always exist between the creation of new and preserve the best of the present, and as a manager, your key challenge is to learn how to manage this tension.
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from
Jeanne M. Liedtka,
Tim Ogilvie
Source: Rotman School of Management
5 pages.
Release Date: 1 September 2011. Prod #: ROT146-PDF-ENG
Designing for Growth: A Tool Kit for Managers HBR case solution

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