Doug Rauch, former president of the supermarket chain Trader Joe’s, has long been of the amount of food, especially fresh, healthy produce that has been wasted in the food system have been harassed. At the same time he was looked frustrated by the paradox of it in the U.S. food system: rising food prices, uncertainty, commonly referred to as a lack of access to enough food to fully meet basic needs at all times, simultaneously defined by an obesity epidemic, suggesting suggesting that low-income communities not only lacked access to food in gene … Read more »

Doug Rauch, former president of the supermarket chain Trader Joe’s, has long been of the amount of food, especially fresh, healthy produce that has been wasted in the food system have been harassed. At the same time he was looked frustrated by the paradox of it in the U.S. food system: rising food prices, uncertainty, commonly referred to as a lack of access to enough food to fully meet basic needs at all times, simultaneously defined by an obesity epidemic, suggesting suggesting that low-income communities do not have access not only to food in general, but to healthy foods in particular. Smoke believed he could build a non-profit model, the grocery advantage grocery stores’ took built waste and channeling that wasted food to be sold at a significant discount. Smoke faced significant challenges in the implementation and execution of its plan, especially legal hurdles in connection with the sale of products after the expiry date, the marketing challenges and convincing grocery store, to combat waste a partnership with him. He had to carefully choose a partner from a number of interested parties. Finally, he would need to change shopping, eating, cooking and behaviors of a community. He hoped to leave a lasting positive impact on the health and a scalable model for change in the United States.
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from
Jose B. Alvarez,
Ryan Johnson
Source: Harvard Business School
24 pages.
Release Date: 7 December 2011. Prod #: 512022-PDF-ENG
Doug Rauch: Solving the paradox of American Food HBR case solution

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