As illustrated stories to tell in the case of the cartoons, tell stories, and pictures. A theory of cartooning suggests that public opinion towards cartoons reflect issues. As such cartoons are a useful tool for measuring and tracking of public opinion over time. This article is based on a historical analysis of the cartoon public opinion on topics related to corporate governance to pursue. In particular, it compares what cartoons before the economic crash of 2008 and what it portrays to resist. The cr … Read more »

As illustrated stories to tell in the case of the cartoons, tell stories, and pictures. A theory of cartooning suggests that public opinion towards cartoons reflect issues. As such cartoons are a useful tool for measuring and tracking of public opinion over time. This article is based on a historical analysis of the cartoon public opinion on topics related to corporate governance to pursue. In particular, it compares what cartoons before the economic crash of 2008 and what it portrays to resist. The criteria of the narrative, able to fight and normative binary transfer were used as a framework to analyze 258 cartoons. We found that three major changes after 2008 crash that hold important lessons for those who govern corporations arose: is the public’s concern is not as much about corporate and individual fraudulent behavior, such as corporate and individual greed , there is an impression that companies do not do bad things as much as they do not do all the good things and ordinary people, workers and taxpayers are the ones who suffer most when companies are not regulated well
.
«Hide

from
Ria Wiid,
Leyland Pitt,
Adam J Mills
Source: Business Horizons
8 pages.
Release Date: 15, November 2012. Prod #: BH497-PDF-ENG
Every story tells a picture: Lessons from cartoons on corporate governance HBR case solution

[related_post themes="flat"]