On 19 December 1985 stood Secretary of State George Shultz, the administration, when he publicly threatened to resign. This action was not based on a substantive disagreements over foreign policy. Instead, Shultz demonstrates his strong opposition to a government plan to require access to polygraph tests for all government officials “highly classified information.” Approximately 182,000 public employees were to be affected by the plan, including about 4,500 members of the State De … Read more »

On 19 December 1985 stood Secretary of State George Shultz, the administration, when he publicly threatened to resign. This action was not based on a substantive disagreements over foreign policy. Instead, Shultz demonstrates his strong opposition to a government plan to require access to polygraph tests for all government officials “highly classified information.” Approximately 182,000 public employees were to be affected by the plan, including about 4,500 members of the State Department. From the beginning, the Reagan administration was keen occurred crushing espionage within the U.S. government through several instances during the last breeches in the security of the United States. This case provides several examples of times in which the security has been violated and chronicles the Reagan administration’s plan, squash espionage. It then details a number of actions that are discussed as Congress followed the question. HKS case number 681.0.
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from
Don Lippincott,
Dorothy Robyn
Source: Harvard Kennedy School
13 pages.
Release Date: 1 January 1986. Prod #: HKS514-PDF-ENG
George Shultz and the polygraph test HBR case solution

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