Follows a very creative founder and his company into greater forces in the sport and industry of cycling. Provides a creative and visionary individual, Jim Gentes, and some of the key questions he as his first product (a revolutionary new helmet) has faced a market success. Details Jim start-up experience, including his beginnings when he tipped in his bedroom inventory, used his garage as a production site, and trade expanded by a helmet with its neighbors for us … Read more »

Follows a very creative founder and his company into greater forces in the sport and industry of cycling. Provides a creative and visionary individual, Jim Gentes, and some of the key questions he as his first product (a revolutionary new helmet) has faced a market success. Details Jim start-up experience, including his beginnings when he tipped in his bedroom inventory, used his garage as a production site, and trade expanded by a helmet with his neighbors for the use of his garage. Giro receive the highest quality and finally placed its superior product on the minds of the sport’s most respected athletes. Giro used this call worked as “Helmet of Champions” gentes as hard to save the company. His helmet was known among cycling enthusiasts and marketers finally achieved a reputation as extemely “hot” new product. Along with success, the company was more complicated, and a growing number of issues need more attention.
This case is only available in printed form (HBP no digital distribution rights to the content) are available. As a result, a digital copy of the Educator case via this website is not available.
«Hide

from
James C. Collins
Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business
30 pages.
Release Date: 1 January 1990. Prod #: SB115A-PDF-ENG
Giro Sport Design (A) HBR case solution

[related_post themes="flat"]