Two female small business owners who have tried to poorer rural and urban India to arrange for funds to ensure the commercial viability of their business in the long run. They had self-help groups with the help of the Indian government’s development programs aimed at poverty reduction and human development. The first woman experienced opposition not only from patriarchal village elders, but also of their own family. She was always training and s … Read more »

Two female small business owners who have tried to poorer rural and urban India to arrange for funds to ensure the commercial viability of their business in the long run. They had self-help groups with the help of the Indian government’s development programs aimed at poverty reduction and human development. The first woman experienced opposition not only from patriarchal village elders, but also of their own family. She was always busy training and the establishment of a workshop to their female neighbors. The second woman was supported by her family, but have also had difficulties producing a suitable site for the production and sale of the work of their group. Despite the support of the government and the allocation of resources to promote their businesses, both women struggled to persuade banks to lend money to them. The long-term sustainability of their groups was thus in doubt.
Author Tanuja Sharma is affiliated with Management Development Institute
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from
Neha Sharma Paliwal,
Tanuja Sharma
Source: Ivey Publishing
7 pages.
Release Date: 24, May 2013. Prod #: W13206-PDF-ENG
Grassroots Female Entrepreneurs: Rural and Urban Small Business Groups in India HBR case solution

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