One of the few remaining manufacturers of lead additives must decide whether to continue producing for overseas use. Banned in the United States, lead additives were still legal in developing countries. Ellie Shannon, the head of monitoring bromine production for the Indiana-based Great Lakes Chemical Corporation (Great Lakes), must Great Lakes’ Directors on whether the company 1) continue production for the foreseeable future, while developing countries advise pulled from leaded veh. .. Read more »

One of the few remaining manufacturers of lead additives must decide whether to continue producing for overseas use. Banned in the United States, lead additives were still legal in developing countries. Ellie Shannon, the head of monitoring bromine production for the Indiana-based Great Lakes Chemical Corporation (Great Lakes), must Great Lakes’ Directors on whether the company 1) continue production for the foreseeable future, while developing countries advise pulling on lead based vehicles unleaded vehicles, 2) wash their hands completely and immediately the line additives business, or 3) aggressive phase out their involvement in this market, with a five-year period, while lobbying for developing countries switch to unleaded gasoline. Each of the options has its downsides, but financially, operationally and in terms of reputation. Great Lakes put a lot of importance in their shareholders’ well-being and remaining a viable company, but it would also be seen to be-and how-a respectable corporate citizen.
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from
James R. Freeland,
Patricia H Werhane,
Andrew C. Wicks,
Jenny Mead
Source: Darden School of Business
10 pages.
Release Date: 18, August 2008. Prod #: UV1171-PDF-ENG
Great Lakes: Great Decisions HBR case solution

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