Comprehensive health insurance reform was a perennial target of the Democratic Party. Although reform efforts had persistently failed, proponents of reform saw a new window of opportunity after the 2008 presidential election. Barack Obama had fought on the promise of reform and was elected by the largest margin of victory for any democrat in decades. In Congress, Democrats held large majorities in the House (257 of 435 seats) and the Senate (58 of 100 seats, plus two independent … Read More »

Comprehensive health insurance reform was a perennial target of the Democratic Party. Although reform efforts had persistently failed, proponents of reform saw a new window of opportunity after the 2008 presidential election. Barack Obama had fought on the promise of reform and was elected by the largest margin of victory for any democrat in decades. In Congress, Democrats held large majorities in the House (257 of 435 seats) and the Senate (58 of 100 seats and two independents who caucused with the Democrats). Soon after his inauguration, President Obama held a forum assembling representatives from Congress, health care and unions to launch his pursuit of health care reform. This case examines the public, legal and political battle that followed. It follows the stakeholders with an interest in health policy and the strategies they used as well as politicians, to promote their goals in the context of U.S. policy making institutions.
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from
Kenneth W. Shotts,
Alexander V. Hirsch
Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business
20 pages.
Release Date: 20, August 2011. Prod #: P74-PDF-ENG
Health Care Reform: 2009-2010 HBR case solution

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