Many companies organize employees into self-managing teams that are left basically to be run with some guidance from an external guide. In fact, comprehensive surveys report that 79% of companies provide in the Fortune 1000 and to date as “authorized”, “self-directed” or “autonomous” teams. Because of their widespread use has a lot of research to understand, devoted to maximize their effectiveness as the best set up self-managing teams. Interestingly, although relatively little attention … Read more »

Many companies organize employees into self-managing teams that are left basically to be run with some guidance from an external guide. In fact, comprehensive surveys report that 79% of companies provide in the Fortune 1000 and to date as “authorized”, “self-directed” or “autonomous” teams. Because of their widespread use has a lot of research to understand, devoted to maximize their effectiveness as the best set up self-managing teams. Interestingly, however, relatively little attention has been paid to the leaders who must supervise such work groups. At first glance, it seems contradictory: Why should a self-managing team, that each guide at all? But the authors research has shown that self-managed teams require a special kind of leadership. In particular, the external managers who contribute most tend to surpass the success of their team on a skill: managing the boundary between the team and the larger organization. This process requires specific behaviors that can be grouped into four basic functions: (1) moving back and forth between the team and the wider organization to build relationships, (2) scouting information necessary (3) impress the team and outside constituents to support each other, and (4) strengthening the team members.
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from
Vanessa Urch Druskat,
Jane V. Wheeler
Source: MIT Sloan Management Review
9 sides.
Release Date: 1 July 2004. Prod #: SMR146-PDF-ENG
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