IBP, the largest U.S. beef and pork processor is degraded with a view of the result and takes a fundamental strategic review in 1990. Having grown since its founding in 1961 to its current position as an inexpensive, innovative manufacturer of boxed beef, and followed very different company strategies that seem to be more successful, more recently, pork, IBP have competitors. IBP must rethink its own corporate strategy and decide whether its distinctive competence is still relevant, and where it is … Read more »

IBP, the largest U.S. beef and pork processor is degraded with a view of the result and takes a fundamental strategic review in 1990. Having grown since its founding in 1961 to its current position as an inexpensive, innovative manufacturer of boxed beef, and followed very different company strategies that seem to be more successful, more recently, pork, IBP have competitors. IBP must rethink its own corporate strategy and decide whether its distinctive competence is still relevant, and where it should be active in the three dimensions of product, geography and vertical integration.
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David J. Collis
Nancy Donohue
Source: Harvard Business School
22 pages.
Release date: 05 March, 1991. Prod #: 391006-PDF-ENG
IBP and the U.S. Meat Industry HBR case solution