Focuses on the decision of Intel’s top management faces at the end of 1984 whether to leave the DRAM (dynamic random access memory) business. Discusses the development of Intel’s distinctive technological competencies and the critical links between its corporate, technology, marketing and production strategies. Examines the effect of the apparent industry structural changes in the relative importance of different technological capabilities and the relationships between corporate, technology, marketing … Read more »

Focuses on the decision of Intel’s top management faces at the end of 1984 whether to leave the DRAM (dynamic random access memory) business. Discusses the development of Intel’s distinctive technological competencies and the critical links between its corporate, technology, marketing and production strategies. Examines the effect of the apparent industry structural changes in the relative importance of different technological skills and the connections between business, technology, marketing and production strategies. Intel was the first successful mover with DRAM products, but it will come up with a trivial market share at the end of 1984. While the organization still believes that the DRAMs are critical of both market and technology leader positions have DRAMs actually a minor role in Intel’s product mix played in the last five years. Logic products are based on microprocessor technology, memory products, Intel replaced as core business. Leads to discussions about the impact of organizational beliefs on technology and manufacturing strategy and top management role in assessing these beliefs during the course of time.
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from
Robert A. Burgelman,
George W. Cogan
Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business
31 pages.
Release Date: 1 January 1989. Prod #: BP256A-PDF-ENG
Intel Corp. (A): The DRAM Decision HBR case solution