Commitment and competence are embedded in how each employee thinks and does his work and how a company organized to do work. It is the author’s view, a company’s only significant advantage. As the need for intellectual capital increases, companies must find ways to ensure that it develops and grows. There are five tools for increasing competence in a company, location, industry and plant: Renting out new talent, invest in employee learning and training, and hire consultants for … Read more »

Commitment and competence are embedded in how each employee thinks and does his work and how a company organized to do work. It is the author’s view, a company’s only significant advantage. As the need for intellectual capital increases, companies must find ways to ensure that it develops and grows. There are five tools for increasing competence in a company, location, industry and plant: Renting out new talent, invest in employee learning and training, hire consultants and partnerships with suppliers, customers and suppliers to share knowledge to create new knowledge and bring new ways of working, remove, alter the employee to learn, and do not fit, and find ways to keep valuable employees. Companies also need to promote employees who are not only competent, but also trys. Employees with too many demands and not enough resources to burn these requirements quickly become depressed and cope with lack of commitment. A company can build three types of commitment: First, the demand on staff by prioritizing work, focusing only on critical activities and streamlining work processes. Second, increase resources by employees creates control over their own work, establishing a vision for the company, the excitement about work, workers compensated fairly, the exchange of information about the company’s long-term strategy and the deployment of new technologies, among others. Third contact requirements to explore resources such as company policies can undermine commitment to ensure that new managers and workers are clear about the expectations, understanding family obligations, and after employees to participate in decision making.
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Dave Ulrich
Source: MIT Sloan Management Review
16 pages.
Release date: 01 December, 1998. Prod #: SMR033-PDF-ENG
Intellectual Capital = Competence x Commitment HBR Case solution

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