In the early 1980s, The Ford Foundation, among other donors, contribute to a new type of organization designed to finance the renovation of older, inner parts of the city, both through renovation of housing and other facilities. Supporting local initiatives company assumes no obligation to projects themselves, but instead will serve as a kind of bank, the choice between proposals from non-profit development organizations submitted. But LISC was not as no-strings-attached grants. Instead, he wanted to ass … Read more »

In the early 1980s, The Ford Foundation, among other donors, contribute to a new type of organization designed to finance the renovation of older, inner parts of the city, both through renovation of housing and other facilities. Supporting local initiatives company assumes no obligation to projects themselves, but instead will serve as a kind of bank, the choice between proposals from non-profit development organizations submitted. But LISC was not as no-strings-attached grants. Instead, they wanted to insure themselves – and the provision of their capital – that there is always a return on investment. When a team of consultants in the LISC is to measure the return on investment, it must first examine how such a return could even be defined. LISC should consider only financial data relating to the repayment of the loan makes it? Or they should consider the impact of catalyzing organizations to support their surrounding neighborhoods? How or should such effects be measured? HKS case number 1370.0
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Alexander Hoffman,
Peter Zimmerman
3 pages.
Release Date: 1 January 1997. Prod #: HKS614-PDF-ENG
Problems in assessing the impact of the Social Investment: The Local Initiatives Support Company (A) (Epilogue) HBR case solution

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