Jim Sharpe, President of extrusion technology, describes the first five years in the aluminum extrusion company, which he bought. It begins with the first day, as he introduced to the staff in 1987 and assured them of. Continuity of the company Over the next two years, his efforts to make the company profitable contain costs, the union decertifying and developing relationships with suppliers. Sharpe learned from mistakes in predicting aluminum inventory and purchasing capital goods … Read more »

Jim Sharpe, President of extrusion technology, describes the first five years in the aluminum extrusion company, which he bought. It begins with the first day, as he introduced to the staff in 1987 and assured them of. Continuity of the company Over the next two years, his efforts to make the company profitable contain costs, the union decertifying and developing relationships with suppliers. Sharpe learned from mistakes in predicting aluminum inventory and purchasing capital equipment for a new product line, whose market never developed. At the end of five years, extrusion technology was profitable and good for growth.
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from
H. Kent Bowen,
Barbara Feinberg
Source: Harvard Business School
12 pages.
Publication Date: Apr 24, 1998. Prod #: 698 096 PDF-ENG
Jim Sharpe: Extrusion Technology, Inc. (C) HBR case solution

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