In May 2003, the President and CEO of Kikkoman Corp. sat in his office in Tokyo weighing various options to strengthen the company’s long-term growth. Kikkoman was the world’s largest producer of soy sauce, mainly because of its pioneering role since the 1950s as the leading promoter of the product, particularly in non-Asian markets. But times had changed. The Japanese domestic market was saturated, had increased competition and Kikkoman needed to think of innovative ways to increase revenue.

In May 2003, the President and CEO of Kikkoman Corp. sat in his office in Tokyo weighing various options to strengthen the company’s long-term growth. Kikkoman was the world’s largest producer of soy sauce, mainly because of its pioneering role since the 1950s as the leading promoter of the product, particularly in non-Asian markets. But times had changed. The Japanese domestic market was saturated, had increased competition and Kikkoman needed to think of innovative ways to increase revenue.
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from
Rohit Deshpande,
Hal Hogan
Source: Harvard Business School
35 pages.
Release Date: 5th January 2004. Prod #: 504067-PDF-ENG
Kikkoman Corp.: Consumer Focused Innovation HBR case solution