The learning process is well-known phenomenon. However, plants show significant differences in learning rates and conscious learning can change the speed of learning through the management efforts. Performed by analysis of quality improvement projects in a factory for over a decade, this article identifies two dimensions of the learning process – conceptual learning, yields know-why and operational learning, which returns expertise. A production line in this work, which was established specifically … Read more »

The learning process is well-known phenomenon. However, plants show significant differences in learning rates and conscious learning can change the speed of learning through the management efforts. Performed by analysis of quality improvement projects in a factory for over a decade, this article identifies two dimensions of the learning process – conceptual learning, yields know-why and operational learning, which returns expertise. A production line in this plant, which produces specially set to create technological knowledge consistently in both know-why and know-how. However, replication was this production line in other factories in the same company behind expectations: neither creation nor transfer of knowledge occurred. The evidence shows that a stable environment with continuity in resources (such as raw material suppliers) improved knowledge creation. In addition, a successful replication management buy-in and knowledge diversity requires.
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from
Michael A. Lapre,
Luk N. Van Wassenhove
Source: California Management Review
20 pages.
Release Date: 1 October 2003. Prod. #: CMR268 PDF ENG
Managing Learning Curves in Factories by Creating and transferring knowledge HBR case solution

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