In 2002, announced Professor Nicholas Negroponte, a successful venture capitalist, author and co-founder and honorary chairman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Lab, its intention to build a PC so cheap as to make it possible to offer Internet – and multimedia -capable machines to millions of children in developing countries. The concept – then often referred to as the “$ 100 PC” – was launched at the Media Lab in 2003, before they spun in a separate non-profit association … Read more »

In 2002, announced Professor Nicholas Negroponte, a successful venture capitalist, author and co-founder and honorary chairman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Lab, its intention to build a PC so cheap as to make it possible to offer Internet – and multimedia -capable machines to millions of children in developing countries. The concept – then often called the “$ 100 PC” called – was launched spun founded at the Media Lab in 2003, before going into a separate non-profit association, One Laptop Per Child (OLPC), followed by Negroponte in January 2005. At the time, skeptics, including technology industry leaders, argues that it simply could not be done. Through innovative design and technology, Negroponte and his team proved them wrong, but struggled to get the concept and machines worldwide ministries of education as a buyer would sell the laptops for their school-age children. In addition, by 2007, many other low-cost PC had arisen OLPC shipping options and had not yet started what some observers to question whether the non-profit strategy and options should rethink
To maximize their effectiveness, color cases should be printed in color.
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from
John A. Quelch
Source: HBS
24 pages.
Publication Date: Aug 13, 2007. Prod #: 508024-PDF-ENG
Marketing the “$ 100 Laptop” (A) HBR case solution