In spring 1999, Matrix Semiconductor was a young start-up on the edge of what the founders as a major technological breakthrough. 3/4 3-D semiconductor memory chips would offer acceptable performance at lower prices: For more than a year, the company had focused almost exclusively on the invention of technology. As the company approached the completion of the first prototype, the founders needed to create an integrated business strategy for the organization. Dan Stee … Read more »

In spring 1999, Matrix Semiconductor was a young start-up on the edge of what the founders as a major technological breakthrough. 3/4 3-D semiconductor memory chips would offer acceptable performance at lower prices: For more than a year, the company had focused almost exclusively on the invention of technology. As the company approached the completion of the first prototype, the founders needed to create an integrated business strategy for the organization. Dan Steere recently the Matrix team, and in his new role as Director of Marketing, was asked to help the practical parameters of a 3-D product, choose what to follow the markets and decide on a suitable business model for the company (drawing on input from the rest of the crew matrix). Evaluates the alternatives for the company, exploring the importance of strategy and strategic decision making. Some of the success factors and pitfalls young companies are taking care of that cease to have to prepare for the development of a legitimate business exclusively on the definition of a business opportunity and begin.
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from
Robert A. Burgelman,
Robert E. Siegel,
Lyn Denend
Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business
28 pages.
Publication Date: Jul 20, 2004. Prod #: SM126A-PDF-ENG
Matrix Semiconductor, Inc. (A): Tackling Challenges of Strategic Dimensions HBR case solution