Neal Keny-Guyer, CEO of Mercy Corps International, strengthened its organization by following the advice of Theodore Roosevelt: “Be smart enough to hire good people and have sense enough to get out of the way.” For eight years, helped Keny-Guyer, Mercy Corps grow in size and scope, and until 2001, provided $ 117 million in social programs for people in more than 30 countries. Convinced that much of this success had come from empowering front-line managers to lead the search for ways in which the agency was … Read more »

Neal Keny-Guyer, CEO of Mercy Corps International, strengthened its organization by following the advice of Theodore Roosevelt: “Be smart enough to hire good people and have sense enough to get out of the way.” For eight years, helped Keny-Guyer, Mercy Corps grow in size and scope, and until 2001, provided $ 117 million in social programs for people in more than 30 countries. Convinced that much of this success was the empowerment front-line managers to get the lead agency in search of opportunities in the area, he wanted to continue the approach. But recent experience in Afghanistan had some weaknesses in Mercy Corps’ ability to maintain an entrepreneurial approach in an emergency situation exposed. What had worked so well in an organization of 200 difficulties now that exceeded 2,000 employees worldwide. On a global leadership conference in late October 2002 Keny-Guyer met with his senior leadership team. In addition to wrestling with the political complexities of working in Iraq, he wanted their input, such as Mercy Corps should react when it was decided to obtain the correct procedure.
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from
Christopher A. Bartlett,
Daniel F. Curran
Source: Harvard Business School
25 pages.
Publication Date: Jun 10, 2003. Prod #: 303079-PDF-ENG
Mercy Corps: Global Social Entrepreneurship (A) HBR case solution

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