In 2010, the two hundredth anniversary of the Mexican revolution against Spain, Mexican President Felipe Calderon hoped he could several important reforms needed to orchestrate Mexico. Mexico had not grown much over the last ten years, losing competitiveness to China and other Asian countries. Several of its institutions, including labor, education, health, energy and antitrust law seemed competitive. But with a weaker peso and more government attention to infrastructure, Caldero … Read more »

In 2010, the two hundredth anniversary of the Mexican revolution against Spain, Mexican President Felipe Calderon hoped he could several important reforms needed to orchestrate Mexico. Mexico had not grown much over the last ten years, losing competitiveness to China and other Asian countries. Several of its institutions, including labor, education, health, energy and antitrust law seemed competitive. But with a weaker peso and more government attention to infrastructure, hoping that Calderon in Mexico, higher-tech exports could regain U.S. market share and progress in Europe and Latin America.
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from
Aldo Musacchio
Richard H.K. Vietor,
Regina Garcia-Cuellar
Source: Harvard Business School
28 pages.
Release date: 07 April 2010. Prod #: 710058-PDF-ENG
Mexico: Crisis and Competitiveness HBR case solution

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