In 1999, the nonprofit Fair Labor Association (FLA) has started to monitor factories around the world for sweatshop-related offenses. Another important charitable players Worker Rights Consortium (WRC), was launched in 2000 to life. The two organizations had similar goals but very different histories, strategies and ways of operating. One big difference was that the FLA board include business, while the WRC board contained no representatives of the industry, but only representatives from the Uni … Read more »

In 1999, the nonprofit Fair Labor Association (FLA) has started to monitor factories around the world for sweatshop-related offenses. Another important charitable players Worker Rights Consortium (WRC), was launched in 2000 to life. The two organizations had similar goals but very different histories, strategies and ways of operating. One big difference was that the FLA include board company, while the WRC board contained no representatives of the industry, but only representative of the United Students Against Sweatshops (USAS), member universities and the labor market-allied NGOs (non-governmental organizations). Mission-wise, the FLA focuses on all the clothing, while the WRC focus only on clothing bearing college and university logos. The fact that the FLA business / industry representatives on their board policy decisions, and the WRC is not included, not just a difference, but a source of direct disagreement and conflicts created. By 2008, the WRC had grown from a membership of 44 colleges and universities as established at 174, and the FLA had grown from 100 colleges and universities to 205th Although the two organizations had often closely connected to the plates and even occasionally together, their shared history had been controversial and turbulent. Among the questions that were under ongoing dispute the role of third-party trade unions (which are not allowed by the government in countries such as China and Vietnam), the problem of “living wage” (which increase production costs significantly), voiced allegations on the website ” FLA Watch “(which seemed to be many-sided and unfair) and the overall impact of the anti-sweatshop movement efforts (which led some to wonder how much progress has been made).
«Hide

from
Victoria Chang
Glenn R. Carroll
Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business
25 pages.
Release Date: 10 June 2008. Prod #: SI108-PDF-ENG
Monitoring factories around the globe: The Fair Labor Association and The Workers Rights Consortium HBR case solution

[related_post themes="flat"]