In the biotech world, the 18-year-old Munich-based MorphoSys was a rarity: it was profitable. The company did not achieve this profitability by developing and selling its own drugs, but by licensing access to its proprietary library of human antibodies. Recently the company decided to deviate from this model and try to develop its own proprietary products. The case allows the analysis of the “license to integrate vertically vs.” business model decisions and can be used to teach principles bu … Read more »

In the biotech world, the 18-year-old Munich-based MorphoSys was a rarity: it was profitable. The company did not achieve this profitability by developing and selling its own drugs, but by licensing access to its proprietary library of human antibodies. Recently the company decided to deviate from this model and try to develop its own proprietary products. The case allows the analysis of the “license to integrate vertically vs.” business model decisions and can be used to teach principles of business model design and the functioning of markets for know-how.
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from
Gary P. Pisano,
Ryan Johnson,
Carin-Isabel Knoop
Source: Harvard Business School
17 pages.
Release Date: 17 March 2011. Prod #: 611046-PDF-ENG
MorphoSys AG: The Evolution of a Biotechnology Business Model HBR case solution

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