S.K. Ko managed Motorola Penang, Malaysia factory, production of telecommunications components and equipment. Faced as a female executive of a multi-ethnic and labor-intensive plant in Asia Co, a number of challenges. She had already promotes quality circles and quality competitions to meet Motorola raised. Extensive training gave workers the skills to solve problems and fix equipment. But Ko was skeptical of empowerment efforts on other sites that Motorola’s much gre goal … Read more »

S.K. Ko managed Motorola Penang, Malaysia factory, production of telecommunications components and equipment. Faced as a female executive of a multi-ethnic and labor-intensive plant in Asia Co, a number of challenges. She had already promotes quality circles and quality competitions to meet Motorola raised. Extensive training gave workers the skills to solve problems and fix equipment. But Ko was skeptical of empowerment efforts on other websites to Motorola for much greater involvement of employees in decision making. She thought empowerment inappropriate, the Asian context. She also thought that many operators would have difficulty upgrading their skills as the world is becoming more information intensive. Other Southeast Asian nations with lower labor costs were a threat to Penang labor-intensive processes. She put Penang until 2000 in a fully automated production process and a design center for all Asia business of Motorola converted.
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from
Janis L. Gogan,
Shoshana Zuboff,
Gloria Schuck
Source: Harvard Business School
18 pages.
Release Date: 10 May 1994. Prod #: 494135-PDF-ENG
Motorola Penang HBR case solution

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