The U.S. Supreme Court struck the laws of 11 states that allowed in-state wineries to sell wine directly to customers in those states, but prevents out-of-state wineries from doing the same. While the decision wine wineries to help serve customers via the Internet, much greater than its economic impact in markets such as real estate and cars. The court’s broad interpretation of the Commerce Clause has the potential of many of the protectionist practices to eliminate the … Read more »

The U.S. Supreme Court struck the laws of 11 states that allowed in-state wineries to sell wine directly to customers in those states, but prevents out-of-state wineries from doing the same. While the decision wine wineries to help serve customers via the Internet, much greater than its economic impact in markets such as real estate and cars. The court’s broad interpretation of the Commerce Clause has the potential of many of the protectionist practices that states have developed to eliminate local businesses from out-of-state shield competition, particularly promoted by the Internet. Save consumers an estimated $ 23700000000 per year if these protectionist practices be eliminated.
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James V. Koch
Source: Business Horizons
9 sides.
Release Date: 15, May 2006. Prod #: BH195-PDF-ENG
Much More at Stake than Gewurztraminer: The U.S. Supreme Court decision Wine HBR case solution

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