Justice is usually defined as “fairness”, but the meaning of fairness suggests both a comparative element (ie, treated the same as the same except they have relevant differences and simultaneous forms of equal opportunities) and a non-comparable element (ie, the notion that every man should be given his due – what is owed, deserved, needed, or deserved). This notice describes how various systems, processes and results are considered are called fair (or unfair) from these two perspectives

Justice is usually defined as “fairness”, but the meaning of fairness suggests both a comparative element (ie, treated the same as the same except they have relevant differences and simultaneous forms of equal opportunities) and a non-comparable element (ie, the notion that every man should be given his due – what is owed, deserved, needed, or deserved). This notice describes how various systems, processes and results are considered are called fair (or unfair) from these two perspectives
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from
Patricia H Werhane,
Donna Wood
7 pages.
Release date: 30 April 1999. Prod #: UV1879-PDF-ENG
A note on social justice HBR case solution