Procter & Gamble (P & G) introduced disposable diapers in the United States in 1961. Since entering the market in 1968, Kimberly-Clark had fought (KC) with P & G for the market leader, with P & G to maintain the lead for the majority of the more than three decades. In the late 1990s, however, KC began to pull away from P & G. Until August 1999, KC was 44 percent share of the $ 4.2 billion U.S. market, while P & G’s stock fell by 36%. As some retailers started dropping off the shelves Pampers, P & G’s leadership … Read more »

Procter & Gamble (P & G) introduced disposable diapers in the United States in 1961. Since entering the market in 1968, Kimberly-Clark had fought (KC) with P & G for the market leader, with P & G to maintain the lead for the majority of the more than three decades. In the late 1990s, however, KC began to pull away from P & G. Until August 1999, KC was 44 percent share of the $ 4.2 billion U.S. market, while P & G’s stock fell by 36%. As some retailers started dropping off the shelves Pampers, P & G executives asked what they could do to get the distribution and reverse the downward trend in the share capital of the disposable diaper market.
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from
Mark Parry
Source: Darden School of Business
13 pages.
Publication Date: Jun 20, 2001. Prod #: UV2912-PDF-ENG
Pampers: The Disposable Diaper War (A) HBR case solution

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