In July 1991, faced Irfan Mustafa, West Asia Area Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of Pepsi Cola Pakistan Incorporated (PCI), several dilemmas. First, as part of the 7-Up assistance, Mustafa, to the rest of Pakistan 7-Up bottlers to convince her to sell assets PCI bottlers and monitor the resulting integration had. Second, Pepsi Cola International focus had shifted to its global brands and since acquiring 7-Up International in 1986, withdrew all marketing and technical su … Read more »

In July 1991, faced Irfan Mustafa, West Asia Area Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of Pepsi Cola Pakistan Incorporated (PCI), several dilemmas. First, as part of the 7-Up assistance, Mustafa, to the rest of Pakistan 7-Up bottlers to convince her to sell assets PCI bottlers and monitor the resulting integration had. Second, Pepsi Cola International focus had shifted to its global brands and since acquiring 7-Up International in 1986, all marketing and technical support for local, but successful Pakistani Pepsi brand, Teem had withdrawn. Given the focus on global brands, Mustafa needed to determine the role of each brand in its portfolio (Pepsi, 7-Up, Mirinda and Teem), with a particular focus on 7-Up and Teem. Finally, in an effort to distinguish it from 7-Up Teem, formerly competitors PCI had developed a milky-cloudy Teem Lemon-lime soft drink. Mustafa had to judge whether rain Teem has great growth potential and if so, find out how to do it. Role of Pakistan in spite of opposition from his bottler This case examines Mustafa dilemmas also affect urban compared to rural marketing and sales challenges.
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from
Wasim Azhar,
Davina Drabkin
Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business
28 pages.
Release Date: 27 June 2008. Prod #: IB84-PDF-ENG
Pepsi Cola Pakistan: Franchising & Product Line Management HBR case solution