In March 2000, plans for the IPO of shares in PetroChina as planned, and institutional investors are assessing the matter. PetroChina was China’s largest oil and gas company and an attractive game to continued economic growth in China. The impending listing on the Hong Kong and New York Stock Exchange has been developed to produce revenue and discipline for the company. Disclosure Policy and a new management compensation system with the management rewards based on … Read more »

In March 2000, plans for the IPO of shares in PetroChina as planned, and institutional investors are assessing the matter. PetroChina was China’s largest oil and gas company and an attractive game to continued economic growth in China. The impending listing on the Hong Kong and New York Stock Exchange has been developed to produce revenue and discipline for the company. Disclosure Policy and a new management compensation system rewards with management based on stock prices suggested a focus on the investors’ interests. At the same time drew attention from both the AFL-CIO to corporate governance concerns with PetroChina and human and labor rights issues related to the parent company of PetroChina. PetroChina was to avoid an investment or a risk worth? Also raises broader questions about the role of government and the private sector.
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from
Alexander Dyck,
Yasheng Huang,
David Lane
Source: Harvard Business School
31 pages.
Release Date: 24, January 2001. Prod #: 701040-PDF-ENG
PetroChina HBR case solution

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