As a luxury fashion products producer and distributor which ports made by other high-end European and American labels, his unique background as a China-based company with a Canadian history. The company and the brand were PORTS International, originally founded in Toronto in 1961 and later acquired by a Chinese immigrant entrepreneur, Alfred Chan, in 1989. Despite the familiar in the 1970s and early 1980s in North America and the UK, the brand lost its fame in the early 1990s … Read more »

As a luxury fashion products producer and distributor which ports made by other high-end European and American labels, his unique background as a China-based company with a Canadian history. The company and the brand were PORTS International, originally founded in Toronto in 1961 and later acquired by a Chinese immigrant entrepreneur, Alfred Chan, in 1989. Despite the familiar in the 1970s and early 1980s in North America and the UK, the brand lost its fame in the early 1990s because of a global recession and poor management. In 1993, Chan for by the new headquarters and factories to build the brand in Xiamen, China, where he started again. After that, the brand as one of the top most sought after fashion labels in China continued to be counted. In 2003 the company went public on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange and began slowly in the Western market. A new label, PORTS 1961, was created for the comeback and attract more high-end consumers. Although China was one of the largest manufacturers of clothing, manufactured products were often associated with cheap, low quality and counterfeiting in China. Since picture is of the utmost importance in the world of luxury goods, how would PORTS overcome this perception of his goods, as well as other challenges and further expand its presence in the local and global market?
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from
Claudia H. L. Woo,
Gerald Yong Gao,
Jiangyong Lu,
Gay Hung Fung
Source: University of Hong Kong
22 pages.
Release Date: 5th June 2008. Prod #: HKU749-PDF-ENG
PORTS: China’s path in the Global Luxury Fashion Boulevard HBR case solution

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