In September 2000, the President of Bridgestone Firestone, the U.S. subsidiary of Japan’s Bridgestone Corp., was invited before a subcommittee of the U.S. Congress failed to make the August appear from the subsidiary in 2000 recall of more than 6.5 million tires. The tires were linked to hundreds of car accidents and dozens of deaths in the United States and elsewhere around the world. This case illustrates the controversy tires and the decisions they made for Bridgestone management … Read more »

In September 2000, the President of Bridgestone Firestone, the U.S. subsidiary of Japan’s Bridgestone Corp., was invited before a subcommittee of the U.S. Congress failed to make the August appear from the subsidiary in 2000 recall of more than 6.5 million tires. The tires were linked to hundreds of car accidents and dozens of deaths in the United States and elsewhere around the world. This case illustrates the controversy tires and the decisions they made for Bridgestone management. Founded tracing Bridgestone development of a regional multinational to a global player through the acquisition of Firestone, a U.S. tire manufacturer in 1900, is the case, such as cultural differences between the two business systems played a role in creating the situation and the design of Bridgestone / Firestone ‘s answers to. A rewritten version of an earlier case.
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Lynn Sharp Paine
Source: Harvard Business School
35 pages.
Publication Date: Jul 10, 2001. Prod #: 302013-PDF-ENG
Recall 2000 Bridgestone Corp. (A) HBR case solution

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