In April 1994, the world witnessed a political milestone in South Africa. After decades of oppression and apartheid, South Africa’s black majority came to power at last, as the African National Congress (ANC), led by the famous Nelson Mandela, rode to power with 63% of votes in the country’s first racially inclusive choice. Eight years after this victory, however, many South Africans are starting to question the changing priorities of the ANC. Although the political … Read more »

In April 1994, the world witnessed a political milestone in South Africa. After decades of oppression and apartheid, South Africa’s black majority came to power at last, as the African National Congress (ANC), led by the famous Nelson Mandela, rode to power with 63% of votes in the country’s first racially inclusive choice. Eight years after this victory, however, many South Africans are starting to question the changing priorities of the ANC. Although the political situation of the country has improved significantly, the economy remains fragile, and some of the most loyal allies of the ANC are clamoring, what they see as a change of faith. Thabo Mbeki, a former political exile of the president was in 1999, now has to decide what democracy means for South Africa and how best to preserve it.
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from
Rawi Abdelal,
Katherine E. Cousins,
Debora L. Spar
Source: Harvard Business School
28 pages.
Publication Date: Feb 26, 2002. Prod #: 702035-PDF-ENG
Remaking the Rainbow Nation: South Africa 2002 HBR case solution

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